The UK government's response to the unemployment crisis so far relies on a quicker bounce back in economic activity than either the Office for Budget Responsibility or the Bank of England are predicting.

Injuries are the leading cause of preventable death in children and young people, and of preventable years of life lost up to age 65. As such, they present a significant cost to individuals, society, and the economy. They also contribute to injustice, with children from poorer backgrounds being more likely to die as a result of an injury.

Tackling preventative illness must remain a top priority for the government in the 2020s. Over half of the disease burden in England is deemed preventable, with one in five deaths attributed to causes that could have been avoided.

This paper considers the implications of the Covid–19 crisis for the UK public finances. The Covid-19 crisis will affect the public finances through higher unemployment, reduced tax revenue and substantial government spending on schemes to support the economy.

The massive expansion of state intervention in response to the Covid-19 pandemic – in particular, to underwrite wages for workers and loans for small and medium-sized businesses – may at first sight seem to be progressive.

The Covid-19 crisis is asking a great deal of the nation’s children, as well as their parents, carers and wider families. Schools and childcare facilities have closed, exams are on hold, and normal social activities are confined to online interactions.

The world is facing unprecedented "environmental breakdown" which could threaten the stability of societies, warns this new report by the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR). Climate change and damage to land, soil, air, water and animal populations are happening at such a scale and pace that the window to prevent catastrophe is closing.

Air pollution is damaging the environment and is a significant determinant of human health. The UK is currently failing to comply with EU law that sets out limits for air pollution, and few countries perform as poorly as the UK in terms of the number of areas that are non-compliant, and the length of time this is likely to remain the case.

The principal driver of air pollution in London is road transport and, within that, diesel vehicles. Nearly 40 per cent of all NOx emissions within London come from diesel vehicles, and unless this is explicitly tackled it will be impossible to cleanse London’s air.

Air pollution is a huge and growing public health problem for the UK, and for London in particular.

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