A new data set of landslides that caused loss of life in Latin America and the Caribbean in the 10-year period from 2004 and 2013 inclusive has been compiled, providing new insight into the impact of landslides in this key part of the world. This data set indicates that in the 10-year period a total of 11 631 people lost their lives across the region in 611 landslides. The geographical distribution of the landslides is highly heterogeneous, with areas of high incidence in parts of the Caribbean (most notably Haiti), Central America, Colombia, and southeast Brazil.

The 2005 Kashmir earthquake of magnitude Mw 7.6 produced 75 km surface rupture showing 3–7 m vertical offset. The surface rupture nearly coinciding with the bedrock geology-defined Balakot-Bagh Fault (BBF) indicates reactivation of the fault. The BBF extends SE with right-step to the Reasi Thrust in Jammu region. Further SE extension of the Reasi Thrust has been mapped with different nomenclature to the 1905 Kangra earthquake meizoseismal region, suggesting linkage between the earthquake and the active fault.

Large earthquakes are thought to release strain on previously locked faults. However, the details of how earthquakes are initiated, grow and terminate in relation to pre-seismically locked and creeping patches is unclear1, 2, 3, 4. The 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake occurred close to Kathmandu in a region where the prior pattern of fault locking is well documented5. Here we analyse this event using seismological records measured at teleseismic distances and Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery.

Large earthquakes are thought to release strain on previously locked faults. However, the details of how earthquakes are initiated, grow and terminate in relation to pre-seismically locked and creeping patches is unclear. The 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake occurred close to Kathmandu in a region where the prior pattern of fault locking is well documented. Here we analyse this event using seismological records measured at teleseismic distances and Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery.

Detailed geodetic imaging of earthquake rupture enhances our understanding of earthquake physics and induced ground shaking. The April 25, 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake is the first example of a large continental megathrust rupture beneath a high-rate (5 Hz) GPS network. We use GPS and InSAR data to model the earthquake rupture as a slip pulse of ~20 km width, ~6 s duration, and with peak sliding velocity of 1.1 m/s that propagated toward Kathmandu basin at ~3.3 km/s over ~140 km.

The Bengal Basin evolved as a rift-controlled extensional basin along the NNE–SSW trending Basin Margin Fault coevally with the 85 East Ridge in the Bay of Bengal during the short-lived hotspot activity south of Bhubaneswar. The basin opening post-dated the Kereguelen Plume magmatism (at ~116 Ma), but predated the phase of continental collision that triggered the rise of the Himalaya in the north. Supply of sediments in the initial stages of basin opening was from the west, mainly through the denudation and erosion of the uplifted Precambrian Shield.

Natural CO2 releases from shallow marine hydrothermal vents are assumed to mix into the water column, and not accumulate into stratified seafloor pools. We present newly discovered shallow subsea pools located within the Santorini volcanic caldera of the Southern Aegean Sea, Greece, that accumulate CO2 emissions from geologic reservoirs. This type of hydrothermal seafloor pool, containing highly concentrated CO2, provides direct evidence of shallow benthic CO2 accumulations originating from sub-seafloor releases.

The massive Mw = 7.8 earthquake which rocked the Nepal Himalaya on 25 April 2015 is the largest to have occurred in this region in the past 81 years. This event occurred by slip on a ~150 km long and 55 km wide, shallow dipping (~5) segment of the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT), causing the Himalaya to lurch southwestward by 4.8  1.2 m over the Indian plate. The main shock ruptured the frictionally locked segment of the MHT, initiating near the locking line and rupturing all the way updip close to its surface expression near the foothills of the Himalaya.

The northeastern part of the Indian Ocean, i.e. the Bay of Bengal (BoB) is located near some of the most complicated tectonic zones on the Earth. An earthquake of magnitude ~6.0 occurred on 21 May 2014 near the coast of Odisha. Occasional moderate to large earthquakes in BoB highlight the need to study precise hypocentre locations, and focal mechanisms to understand the cause of intraplate seismicity in BoB.

Original Source

A remote sensing and GIS based landslide susceptibility zonation (LSZ) of the Tehri reservoir rim region has been presented here. Landslide causal factors such
as land use/land cover, photo-lineaments, landslide incidences, drainage, slope, aspect, relative relief, topographic wetness index and stream power index were
derived from remote sensing data. Ancillary data included published geological map, soil map and topographic map. Correlation between factor classes and

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