It's a pivotal time for energy transitions. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic continues to overshadow global economies, and the pathway to recovery remains uncertain.

Order of the Supreme Court of India in the matter of Tamil Nadu Generation and Distribution Corporation Ltd. & Others Vs M/s Century Flour Mills Ltd. & Others dated 25/01/2022.

The matter related to cogeneration and generation of electricity from renewable sources of energy by providing suitable measures and the obligation of the entities to purchase electricity generated from the renewable energy method.

Blockchain for sustainable energy and climate in the Global South: Use cases and opportunities, illustrates a road map to accelerate the clean energy, low-carbon transition, and climate change mitigation through blockchain technology, providing a framework for linking climate financing with climate accounting.

Global climate change will likely add pressure to international, national and sub-national security due to its nature as a threat multiplier. The energy system is at the heart of this challenge. On the one hand, two thirds of global emissions come from burning fossil fuels.

This paper applies WRI’s 'Framework to Assess the Sustainable Development Impacts of Renewable Power Technologies' to estimate the economic rate of return (ERR) associated with prominent renewable energy (RE) technologies in three Indian states: Maharashtra, Jharkhand, and Assam.

India can potentially create about 3.4 million jobs (short and long term) by installing 238 GW solar and 101 GW new wind capacity to achieve the 500 GW non-fossil electricity generation capacity by 2030 goal. These jobs represent those created in the wind and on-grid solar energy sectors.

An energy system centred on renewable energy can help resolve many of Africa’s social, economic, health and environmental challenges. A profound energy transition is not only feasible, it is essential for a climate-safe future in which sustainable development prerogatives are met.

The year 2021 placed exceptional demands on electricity markets around the world. Strong economic growth, combined with more extreme weather conditions than in 2020, including a colder than average winter, boosted global electricity demand by more than 6% – the largest increase since the recovery from the financial crisis in 2010.

Under the Paris Agreement and COP26, countries enhanced their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and declared ambitious mitigation pledges such as net zero. Despite making a sizeable difference to greenhouse gas emissions and global temperature rise, we still need to set the world on a climate-safe pathway.

Decentralised renewable energy solutions linked to livelihoods is an important step in maximising the benefits of energy access for socio-economic development.

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