India can potentially create about 3.4 million jobs (short and long term) by installing 238 GW solar and 101 GW new wind capacity to achieve the 500 GW non-fossil electricity generation capacity by 2030 goal. These jobs represent those created in the wind and on-grid solar energy sectors.

An energy system centred on renewable energy can help resolve many of Africa’s social, economic, health and environmental challenges. A profound energy transition is not only feasible, it is essential for a climate-safe future in which sustainable development prerogatives are met.

The year 2021 placed exceptional demands on electricity markets around the world. Strong economic growth, combined with more extreme weather conditions than in 2020, including a colder than average winter, boosted global electricity demand by more than 6% – the largest increase since the recovery from the financial crisis in 2010.

Under the Paris Agreement and COP26, countries enhanced their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and declared ambitious mitigation pledges such as net zero. Despite making a sizeable difference to greenhouse gas emissions and global temperature rise, we still need to set the world on a climate-safe pathway.

Decentralised renewable energy solutions linked to livelihoods is an important step in maximising the benefits of energy access for socio-economic development.

The Indian utility-scale RE sector was characterised by contrasting fortunes in 2020 and the first half (H1) of 2021. Interest to invest remained robust even amid the COVID-19 disruption with solar PV and hybrid solar-wind capacity awarded rising 35% year-over-year to 21 GW in 2020.

The 2021 edition of Climate Policy Initiative’s Global Landscape of Climate Finance provides the most comprehensive overview of global climate-related primary investment. Total climate finance has steadily increased over the last decade, reaching USD 632 billion in 2019/2020, but flows have slowed in the last few years.

Agrivoltaics, the practice of generating solar power on farmland in ways that complement agricultural production, could become an important new renewable energy sector in India, according to a new report from the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA).

This analysis looks at how project risks and risk perception for wind and solar have evolved from 2011 to 2020 to understand the impact of policies on the RE sector. It tracks the credit ratings of wind and solar projects and maps them against significant RE policies on a timeline.

How can the ocean contribute renewable energy to the African ‘Blue Economy’, bringing opportunities to millions of Africans and reducing or replacing carbon emissions, and which strategic actions can help it reach this potential?

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