Natural wetlands are in long-term decline around the world says this global report on the state of wetlands. Between 1970 and 2015, inland and marine/coastal wetlands both declined by approximately 35%, where data are available, three times the rate of forest loss.

Today, there are an estimated 370 million indigenous peoples across the world. Although they represent a relatively small portion of the global population, they account for the largest portion of linguistic and cultural diversity on Earth.

The Ramsar Convention recognizes the interdependence of people on wetlands for their important economic, cultural, scientific and recreational values.

Degradation of wetlands reduces resilience against water-related hazards such as floods, droughts and storm surges.

In support of the UN International Year of Family Farming, Ramsar’s theme for World Wetlands Day 2014 is Wetlands and agriculture.

The Secretariat of the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (Ramsar Convention) has announced that, following the approval by the Standing Committee of the draft resolutions for consideration by the 11th meeting of the Conference of the Contracting Parties (COP 11), the Secretariat has finalized all the draft resolutions.

Despite the production of more food and extraction of more water
globally, wetlands continue to decline and public health and living
standards for many do not improve. This new report focuses on the often complex inter-relationships between wetland ecosystems and human health.

It is clear that in all regions of the world there will be continued growth in the demand for reliable supplies of water for climate change adaptation, food security, water security, human and economic development.

The Ramsar Secretariat has released the report of the expert workshop "Achieving Carbon Offsets through Mangroves and Other Wetlands,