Power infrastructure, which includes assets for generation, transmission, and distribution of power, is vulnerable to manifestations of climate change.

In India, around three lakh children die of water-borne diseases every year, with diarrhoea alone causing more than 50 per cent of the deaths. Despite the primary sources of water in the country—groundwater and surface water—being highly contaminated, only 32 per cent of the Indian households get water from a treated source.

India plans to add 100 GW of solar electric power generation by 2022 to an existing system (with an installed capacity of close to 330 GW, as on January 2018, from all sources). Selection of sites for such a large infrastructure investment is definitely an important decision.

Access to electricity can bring about a transformative change in the economic conditions and growth of any country. It not only helps in improving the living conditions of the society at large, but also provides them with ample revenue opportunities to earn a livelihood.

Last year, Karnataka announced a landmark policy on electric vehicles, becoming the first Indian state to do so. Now, the Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation (BMTC) is in the process of procuring its first fleet of 40 electric buses.

Over the past decade, India’s cities have been witnessing an increasing trend in motorization with deteriorating air quality, and there have been calls to promote public transport as a way out of this gridlock.

This study comprehensively examines the manufacturing supply chain of different components used in RE systems, especially wind and solar technology, in India.

The Government of India (GoI) initiated the ‘100 Smart Cities Mission’ in 2014. This has triggered deliberations across the country on the concept of smart cities, the need and the orientation of the Mission in the context of India’s present urbanisation scenario. The concept of a ‘Smart City’ is a relatively new phenomenon in India.

A strong support to domestic solar manufacturing sector coupled with fortuitous global developments for the industry have enabled Chinese firms to dominate the global market.

As a large developing country, India’s challenge is to meet its development aspirations in a carbon-constrained world.

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