Strategically placed sensors can monitor air pollution and provide a detailed picture of air quality and its variability within a region. Low-cost sensors (LCSs) that measure PM2.5 are becoming increasingly popular because of their low cost, ease of use, and portability.

The impacts of climate variability, climate change, and extreme events are visible globally and in India. The Global Climate Risk Index 2021 ranks India seventh, considering the extent to which India has been affected by the impacts of weather-related loss events (storms, floods, heatwaves, etc.).

Meeting India’s short- and long-term climate commitments made at COP26 entails a complete economic transformation, which can have considerable developmental tradeoffs.

Regulatory air pollution monitoring in India is mostly limited to urban areas. Without a dense network of monitors, it is difficult to capture the fine spatial variations of PM2.5, one of the major pollutants with severe implications for human health.

he Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC), Government of India, launched the National Clean Air Programme (NCAP) in 2019, with the aim to improve air-quality levels in non-attainment cities. NCAP has identified 122 non-attainment cities (cities that violate the national ambient air quality standards).

National Clean Air Programme (NCAP), was launched by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC) in 2019, with the target to reduce particulate matter concentration level by 20-30% in several non-attainment cities in India. These non-attainment cities do not meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS).

The impacts of climate variability, climate change, and extreme events are visible globally and in India. The Global Climate Risk Index 2021 ranks India seventh, considering the extent to which India has been affected by the impacts of weather-related loss events (storms, floods, heatwaves, etc.).

The impacts of climate variability, climate change, and extreme events are visible globally and in India. The Global Climate Risk Index 2021 ranks India seventh, considering the extent to which India has been affected by the impacts of weather-related loss events (storms, floods, heatwaves, etc.).

India has 21 of the 30 cities with the worst air quality in the world. The transport sector is a major contributor (40%–80%) to air pollution in the cities. Hence, decarbonising the transport sector with the deployment of electric vehicles (EVs)is a crucial step in mitigating air pollution.

Changes in the timing and magnitude of rainfall can put a severe strain on agriculture. Additionally, an increase in extreme climate events such as heavy rainfall and dry spells can also affect agriculture. In Karnataka, agriculture is the key contributor to the state’s economy.

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