The Government of India’s NFHS–4 offers the best new data on open defecation in rural India to be eleased in over a decade. Although open defecation has become less common than it was 10 years ago, it is still highly prevalent, with more than half of rural households reporting open defecation. On average, change has been slow, even during the period of the Swachh Bharat Mission.

The paper draws significant inputs and builds on the thematic Sector Financing WASH paper prepared by the Secretariat for SACOSAN VII, Ministry of Climate Change, Government of Pakistan.

Question raised in Lok Sabha on ODF Villages, 21/12/2017. As on 19.12.2017, 2,93,753 villages have been declared Open Defecation Free (ODF) and out of which 1, 81,771 villages have been verified for ODF.

The Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) has indicted the National Mission for Clean Ganga (NMCG), a nodal central agency to implement the government's flagship 'Namami Gange' programme, for delay in executing the Ganga cleaning projects, non-utilisation of fund meant for river cleaning and lapses in monitoring.

The Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) has indicted the National Mission for Clean Ganga (NMCG), a nodal central agency to implement the government's flagship 'Namami Gange' programme, for delay in executing the Ganga cleaning projects, non-utilisation of fund meant for river cleaning and lapses in monitoring.

The discourses on rural and urban spaces in India in the context of physical infrastructure have divulged their inherent characteristic differences.

It is easy to take a toilet for granted – lock the door, do your business, flush when finished, and forget all about it. But for 2.3 billion people worldwide – almost one in three – such a normal part of daily life is out of reach.

The Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation has updated the existing guidelines for Swachh Bharat Mission (Gramin). The revised guidelines aims to help the States/UTs and other stakeholders to find all the important decisions, advisories of the Ministry at one place and provide an improved understanding of the programme.

Sri Lanka’s ambitious goals for economic growth and joining the community of uppermiddle-income countries call for setting high standards for the water supply and sanitation (WSS) sector.

In rural areas, roughly 72 percent and 12 percent of people in urban areas still relieve themselves in the open.

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