Recycling has been taking place in South Africa for more than three decades, driven by social and economic needs. While the waste hierarchy is embedded in national policy, an extensive legislative framework has made it more and more challenging for the public and private sector to remain compliant and competitive in a local and global market, and still drive waste away from landfill towards reuse, recycling and recovery. A local recycling economy, on par with many developed countries, is in part due to a large and active informal waste sector.

Over half a billion children are living in areas with extremely high levels of floods and nearly 160 million children live in areas of high or extremely high droughts. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that 26% of the annual 6.6 million deaths of children under-five are linked to environment-related causes and conditions.

Order of the Gujarat High Court in the matter of Self Employed Women's Association & Others Vs State of Gujarat dated 25/01/2017 regarding integration of waste pickers in the system of waste management, Gujarat.

In just over half a century, plastics have become pervasive throughout the economy, due to their versatility and cost-effectiveness. Yet alongside clear benefits, today’s plastics system has significant drawbacks. This need not be the case, however.

This paper highlights a significant opportunity to accelerate progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals.

This report by WSSCC and FANSA gives voice to the sanitation and hygiene needs and aspirations of marginalised groups in India. It is the culmination of 18 consultations held between October and December 2015 with women and adolescents, the elderly and disabled, sanitation workers and transgender persons.

The paper reports on a systematic review research process to determine the enabling factors for waste pickers to operate in the informal economy in South Africa. Twenty-eight South African journal articles, theses and position and policy papers were sourced and appraised. The results indicate that recognition of the waste pickers in the waste system is the most enabling factor for them to operate. The concept of recognition is analysed, described and explained as assisting waste pickers to become more visible, having a voice and to be validated.

KOLKATA, From reclaiming parks and open spaces to promoting carpools and empowering rag-pickers to manage waste, denizens of this eastern metropolis are pitching in to make the city green.

This e-book produced by Earth Day Network-India compiles accounts of ways that twenty four organisations around India have helped to green their cities. It documents what was done, the problems faced in implementing the novel strategies and the achievements.

These UNEP guidelines for national waste Management seeks to provide strategic guidance to countries whose waste management systems are disorganized, haphazard or under-resourced or are in need of a review of their current strategies.

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