Nature-based Solutions (NbS) can help cities address urgent and fundamental environmental challenges by bringing ecosystems services back into cities and rebalancing cities’ relationships with their surrounding areas.

Across Asia, cities are contending with a wide range of food-related issues but most lack a dedicated or coherent set of food policies. For most cities in Asia, food has been a policy and governance blind spot, while national food policy has distinctly lacked an urban perspective.

The rankings under Ease of Living Index 2020 were announced for cities with a population of more than a million, and cities with less than a million people. 111 cities participated in the assessment exercise that was conducted in 2020.

This publication showcases how ADB and the Government of Rajasthan have partnered together to bring sustainable development to the cities and towns of Rajasthan, in northwest India.

Social-ecological transformation in Asian cities is instrumental to achieving many global development and climate targets. As dense settlements of human and economic activity, Asian cities present unique challenges but also opportunities for low-carbon transitions.

COVID-19 pandemic has given us an opportunity to build sustainable cities for a better quality of life says this global report on cities released by UN-Habitat on 31 October 2020. If integrated through inclusive policies, migrants will not only ease skill shortages, but will contribute to the social, economic cultural enrichment of their host communities.

In a rapidly urbanising world, Malawi remains one of the least urbanised countries in Africa. Approximately 16.7 percent of Malawi’s population live in urban areas. Nevertheless, the country is urbanising at a moderate rate of approximately 3.7–3.9 percent per year.

On 8 April 2019, a Round Table was held in the The Hague, for the China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development and its Task Force on Green Urbanization and Environmental Improvement. This is the report of the Round Table.

For African cities to grow economically as they have grown in size, they must create productive environments to attract investments, increase economic efficiency, and create livable environments that prevent urban costs from rising with increased population densification.

This paper surveys the recent literature exploring the causes of urban pollution in the developing world and the implications of such pollution for a city's competitiveness. Within a system of cities, cities compete for jobs and people.

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