This study explores the benefits that can accrue if cities prioritise active mobility and public transport. It quantifies the benefits of walking, cycling, and public transport in the Africa region, comparing alternate investment scenarios for the 188 largest African cities.

Addressing the climate crisis will require rapid, sustained transformation in every country and every sector of industrial activity.

Cycling has significant economic benefits—for individuals, cities, and society—and functions as a low-cost, high-yield, scalable solution to climate and equity issues. Investments in cycling infrastructure also create jobs and opportunities to expand existing industries or develop new ones.

As low and middle-income countries urbanise and grow wealthier, the rates of private motor vehicle use have soared. This severely strains their transport systems and is leading to social, economic, and environmental harm. The capacity to plan for these changes has not proven sufficient.

Paratransit (also known as informal or semiformal public transport) is a dominating force in urban transport systems today. In many parts of the world, primarily lower- and middle-income countries (LICs & MICs), paratransit provides crucial access to jobs, goods, and services.

Transportation network companies (TNCs), defined as digital applications that match potential riders with drivers in real time, will never substitute for a robust, high-capacity transit network and compact, pedestrian-friendly development in terms of enabling large numbers of people to move efficiently around cities.

In Opportunities for Increasing Sustainable Transport: Spotlight on Dallas, Denver, Nashville, ITDP takes a more in depth look at how U.S. cities are implementing sustainable transport and shifting away from drive-alone trips.

Many US cities are failing to connect people to jobs through mass transit, according to a new report from ITDP that uses census and employment data to establish 12 new benchmarks for how mass transit systems serve urban populations.

This report addresses one of the most tragic and preventable health issues affecting youth in cities around the world: road traffic deaths and injuries.

Walkability is a crucial first step in creating sustainable transportation in an urban environment. Effectively understanding and measuring the complex ecology of walkability has proven challenging for many organizations and governments, given the various levels of policy-making and implementation involved.

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