As low and middle-income countries urbanise and grow wealthier, the rates of private motor vehicle use have soared. This severely strains their transport systems and is leading to social, economic, and environmental harm. The capacity to plan for these changes has not proven sufficient.

Paratransit (also known as informal or semiformal public transport) is a dominating force in urban transport systems today. In many parts of the world, primarily lower- and middle-income countries (LICs & MICs), paratransit provides crucial access to jobs, goods, and services.

Transportation network companies (TNCs), defined as digital applications that match potential riders with drivers in real time, will never substitute for a robust, high-capacity transit network and compact, pedestrian-friendly development in terms of enabling large numbers of people to move efficiently around cities.

In Opportunities for Increasing Sustainable Transport: Spotlight on Dallas, Denver, Nashville, ITDP takes a more in depth look at how U.S. cities are implementing sustainable transport and shifting away from drive-alone trips.

Many US cities are failing to connect people to jobs through mass transit, according to a new report from ITDP that uses census and employment data to establish 12 new benchmarks for how mass transit systems serve urban populations.

This report addresses one of the most tragic and preventable health issues affecting youth in cities around the world: road traffic deaths and injuries.

Walkability is a crucial first step in creating sustainable transportation in an urban environment. Effectively understanding and measuring the complex ecology of walkability has proven challenging for many organizations and governments, given the various levels of policy-making and implementation involved.

There can be an 80% cut in CO2 emissions if cities embrace 3 revolutions (3R) in vehicle technology: automation, electrification, and, most importantly, ride sharing. This report examines analysis from ITDP and UC Davis showing how 3R synergy provides 40% reduction in urban vehicle transportation costs globally by 2050.

Many of the world’s most important cities are expanding rapidly without adequate transportation planning. People Near Rapid Transit (PNT) measures the number of residents in a city who live within a short walking distance (1 km) of high-quality rapid transit.

The BRT Standard is the centerpiece of a global effort by leaders in bus transportation design to establish a common definition of bus rapid transit (BRT) and ensure that BRT systems more uniformly deliver world-class passenger experiences, significant economic benefits, and positive environmental impacts.

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