India’s current per capita electricity consumption is less than a quarter of the world average but is expected to grow significantly in the future. Shared socio-economic pathways (SSPs) are narratives visualising alternative futures of the world.

The Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW), issued a new report concluding that distributed solar energy can play a major role in bridging India’s massive gap in delivering rural healthcare services, both as a primary and backup source of power.

Renewable energy job creation and skill development is one of the Indian government’s foremost objectives. However, credible information on the number of jobs that have been created so far, and those that can be created in future to achieve India’s renewable energy goal of 175 gigawatts (GW) by 2022, has been lacking.

If the Railways were to consider the 5 GW target, one of the first steps for its successful implementation, is to develop an understanding of the policy and regulatory scenario across various states, so as to understand the opportunities and challenges for solar developers to set up projects.

In India, only 46 per cent of the cultivated land is irrigated. With more than 19 million agriculture electricity connections, irrigation accounts for more than a fifth of the country’s total power sales.

Electricity generated from any source, whether traditional or renewable, needs to be consumed instantly. This limitation of electricity has led to the development of energy storage technologies. Energy storage has been part of the electric system for decades.

India is at a critical juncture in scaling renewable energy to provide energy access to growing cities and vast rural communities.

Total investment requirements to meet India’s 100 GW solar target, including the costs of project, metering infrastructure and gas-based back up, would range between USD 120 billion and USD 147 billion. However, the current trajectory of solar PV investment in India is significantly short of the mammoth annual investment required.

This policy brief highlights the significance of ‘mineral resource security’ for India in delivering its ambitious plans for development and economic growth.

The Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) submitted by various nations and the subsequent Paris Agreement on climate change announced in December 2015 has decisively put the nations on a path to stringent mitigation of greenhouse gases.

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