A Greenpeace India, Gujarat Energy Research Management Institute (GERMI) and IWMI-Tata Water Policy Program analysis finds that if solar pumps were to replace traditional water pumps in farms across the country, India could surpass its solar target of 100 GW by 2022.

New report reveals 13 solutions to air pollution that can help reduce pollution levels by 40% nationally. A new study by Louisiana State University (LSU) points out towards 13 measures that can reduce air pollution levels by almost 40 percent and avoid nine lakh premature deaths caused by air pollution in India every year.

The city of Chennai has the potential to be a solar champion, according to a Greenpeace India report, titled, Rooftop Revolution: Unleashing Chennai’s Rooftop Potential. The report finds that the total rooftop solar potential of this city is 1,380 MW. If realised, this can help the city reduce the power demand by about 10%.

The historical city of Hyderabad has the potential to be a solar champion, according to a Greenpeace India report, titled, Rooftop Revolution: Unleashing Hyderabad’s Rooftop Potential. The report finds that the total rooftop solar potential of this city is 
1730 MW.

Airpocalypse-II, a Greenpeace India report , analyses PM10 annual average recorded for 280 cities which have 630 million, or 53% citizens of the country’s total population. A massive part of the population, 580 million (47%) of the population are living in areas where no air quality data is available.

New analysis of India’s coal power tariff data shows that replacing the most expensive coal power plants with electricity generated by solar photovoltaic’s (PV) and wind can save discoms and consumers up to 54,000 crores ($8.3 billion) annually.

The use of sewage to meet coal power plants’ cooling needs will not resolve the conflict over water between thermal power plants and farmers and urban communities, said Greenpeace India, in a report titled ‘Pipe Dreams’.

Damning information obtained by Greenpeace India through online reports and Right to Information applications from State Pollution Control Boards across India, shows that none of the Indian cities comply with standards prescribed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and very few cities in southern India comply to Central Pollution Control Boar

As winter sets in and smog envelopes the North Indian belt further, yet another damning report stresses on the urgent need to address the problem of air pollution in India and China.

In an alarming assessment by the Global Burden of Disease project, India has overtaken China in the number of deaths due to ambient (outdoor) air pollution, in 2015. The study showed continuous increase in the number of premature deaths in India since 1990.

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