This report examines the challenge of bringing power to over one billion people who live without electricity, mostly in remote, rural areas in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Under a business-as-usual scenario, almost 700 million people will still be without access to electricity in 2030, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa.

This study examines the political economy of road safety in India, with a focus on Mumbai. The idea is to identify the underlying factors embedded in the political, economic and social framework of the city which influence road safety.

Solar lamps and solar home systems are increasingly seen as a route to electrification in rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Much of the population that would be served by such systems is vulnerable to climate variability and extremes.

This report presents an overview of the current evidence base on the complex relationships between climate change and human mobility.

This paper explores different mechanisms for delivering climate finance at the local level. It focuses on the experiences of a national climate fund – the Climate Resilient Green Economy (CRGE) facility in Ethiopia – and a sub-national source – the County Climate Change Funds (CCCFs) in Kenya.

This research shows that governments in Europe and the European Union (EU) are continuing to subsidise oil, gas and coal, fuelling dangerous climate change with taxpayers’ money both at home and abroad. The EU and all its Member States have committed to phasing out environmentally harmful subsidies, including those to fossil fuels, by 2020.

As low-income countries develop, people’s diets change. They tend to move from being high in cereals (maize, rice, wheat), starchy staples (potato, cassava, plantain) and fibre, to more westernised patterns that are high in sugars, fats and animal-source foods. This has been termed the nutrition transition.

Global shifts in water and sanitation will have a profound effect on societies and economies. Other transformations are shaping these shifts, including where people live, what they expect from governments and markets, their productive and polluting activities, how they innovate and whether they pursue conflict or peace.

The majority of the world’s 800 million food-insecure people live in regions where water and food security are intimately linked. Tackling the underlying causes of food insecurity therefore means addressing a set of livelihood vulnerabilities, including access to water for domestic and productive uses.

Climate change will have significant impacts on economic activity and value chains in Uganda. But it can also provide new possibilities for people and businesses – for example, to create new products and services, develop new markets and access new funding streams and finance mechanisms.

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