This report explores for the first time the scale of the challenge for 20 cities across the world to reach selected targets set out in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). More than half of the targets included will require a profound acceleration of efforts if they are to be achieved by the majority of selected cities.

Now the coal industry claims that expanding coal use is critical to fighting extreme poverty and improving energy access for billions of people in developing countries. In fact, the opposite is true.

Men are more than twice as likely to be in formal full-time employment as women in 17 countries with poor records on gender equality.

Children in Africa will on current trends account for 43% of global poverty by 2030, almost double the current share, due to a combination of demographic change, deep poverty and extreme inequality, warns a new report from the Overseas Development Institute.

With the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) now agreed, the real test of their success lies in their implementation. Over half the world's population now live in cities and by 2050 this will rise to two-thirds. Most of this growth will take place in developing countries due to rising migration from rural areas.

This working paper explores the current development pattern of Senegal from geographical and economic perspectives, and its impact on climate vulnerability.

Data collection methods and poverty measures have not caught up with the reality of an increasingly urbanised world; as a result, it is increasingly likely that urban poverty is underestimated.

At a global level, the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) target 1.2 of halving poverty according to national definitions gets less attention than the target of eradicating extreme poverty worldwide. For country governments focusing on implementing the 2030 Agenda however, national poverty is more politically salient and relevant to policy.

This paper explains how and why improved water management on the farm matters for women and girls, and what can be done to better support opportunities for them, as well as for men and boys, in the face of climate change.

This paper aims to answer three research questions for each of the three contexts assessed: What is the availability and use of financial services? How can financial services contribute to building climate resilience in terms of managing climate- related risks and exploiting climate-related opportunities?

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