The degradation of biomass during storage leads to several unfavourable outcomes including greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, feedstock/energy losses, and economic losses.

IEA Bioenergy Task 33 monitors the status of thermal gasification in its member countries, and publishes a Status report every three years.

IEA Bioenergy Task 33 monitors the status of thermal gasification in its member countries, and publishes a Status report every three years.

The use of biomass for heat and power production is supported in many IEA countries since biomass as a renewable fuel can effectively substitute fossil fuels and consequently reduce fossil CO2. During biomass combustion, inhalable particulate matter smaller than 10 micrometres (PM10) can be generated which can cause adverse health impacts.

This IEA Bioenergy report provides an overview of the current status of biomass cofiring. The report shows that the firing and co-firing of biomass as a replacement for coal in large pulverised coal boilers can be a very attractive option for the utilisation of biomass materials for power production, and for the delivery of renewable energy.

Bioenergy is, and will continue to be, a substantial part of the global renewable energy supply in a low carbon economy. Sustainable production and use of bioenergy offers tremendous opportunities for creating positive socio-economic and environmental impacts. The water-energy nexus has been identified as one of those opportunities.

This publication provides the summary and conclusions from the workshop ‘Future Biomass-based Transport Fuels’ held in conjunction with the meeting of the Executive Committee of IEA Bioenergy in Helsinki, Finland, on 10 May 2011.

The new IEA report assesses the emissions reductions potential and fuel efficiency of various fuels for urban buses and finds that replacing fossil fuels with efficient biofuels is most effective in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emission.