A new report by Amazon Watch and Stand.Earth finds that most banks have failed to implement policies that would prevent the worst impacts of the oil industry in the Amazon.

This Insight provides a brief introduction to the topic of tropical degradation, a summary of key results, and directions for future research and policy. The analysis reinforces the recent relevance of degradation in the Brazilian Amazon, and finds that there is a close relationship between degradation and deforestation.

Rural credit provides essential financing for Brazilian agribusiness, with the amounts of credit established annually in government plans corresponding to nearly 30% of the total value of agricultural production in the country.

Rural credit provides essential financing for Brazilian agribusiness, with the amounts of credit established annually in government plans corresponding to nearly 30% of the total value of agricultural production in the country.

This new WRI report estimates that legal and illegal mining in the Amazon now cover more than 20% of Indigenous lands – over 450,000 square kilometers. It also finds that Indigenous lands with mining experienced higher incidences of tree cover loss than on those without – at least three times greater in Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru.

Indigenous populations of the Amazon own 210 million hectares of land and have proven to be highly skilled in the field of forest conservation: the deforestation rate is 0.8%, i.e., even less than that of protected areas (1.1%) and obviously significantly lower than that of the Amazon as a whole.However, under the rules of the game as set forth

The report ‘Living Planet’ is released every two years, and keeps track of around 4,000 species spread across nearly 17,000 population of the planet.

The largest tropical rainforest on the planet, the Amazon plays a critical role as a storehouse of carbon and mediator of the global water cycle and holds a greater share of the world’s known biodiversity than any other ecosystem.

The Wampis is an indigenous group comprised of thousands of members whose ancestors have lived in the Amazon rainforest of northern Peru for centuries.

A few years ago, the Peruvian government launched a program to protect the rainforest.

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