Climate change will almost certainly heat the world so much it can never recover, major study finds

Much of Asia may see 50 per cent more rainfall due to climate change, although countries like Pakistan and Afghanistan may experience a decline in rainfall by 20 to 50 per cent, says a new report b

This white paper documents research conducted to assess the impact of climate change in Southeast Asia, especially in regards to differing consequences for rural and urban areas and in relation to flood control and ecosystem vulnerability.

An international, peer-reviewed publication released each summer, the State of the Climate is the authoritative annual summary of the global climate published as a supplement to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

Asia records $10bn economic loss as severe flooding continues in July, according to Aon catastrophe report.

This Interim Report on Climate Change over India prepared by the Centre for Climate Change Research (CCCR) in the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM) Pune, is intended to provide a brief overview of (a) Updated assessment of observed climate change over India (b) Future climate projections over India (c) Development of the IITM Earth

Natural disasters pose grave threats to electric grids and their ability to deliver reliable electricity to communities. Climate change, expanding populations, and insufficiently diversified sources make our energy future more unpredictable. This report explores how extreme weather and other natural catastrophes are evolving in the U.S.

This paper investigated the meteorological role of an extraordinary rain event over Artvin. Although alert messages were prepared by the Turkish State Meteorological Service on August 23 at 09:00 UTC, 11 people died and infrastructures, buildings, private property, and public goods were damaged as a result of the flash flood. It is hoped that more detailed studies will be performed on synoptic development leading to extreme summer precipitation events in the eastern Black Sea.

Unabated climate change would bring devastating consequences to countries in Asia and the Pacific, which could severely affect their future growth, reverse current development gains, and degrade quality of life, according to a report produced by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK).

Extreme events currently expected to happen on average once every 100 years could, in vulnerable coastlines around the world, occur every decade or even every year by 2050 warns this new study published in the journal “Nature Communications”

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