A new study indicates that millions of people, particularly those who are living in megacities, could be exposed to more deadly heat wave these coming years, according to a new study.

A report produced by the Emirates Wildlife Society in association with WWF (EWS-WWF) has revealed a comprehensive summary detailing the projected risks and impacts of climate change in the UAE.

Question raised in Rajya Sabha on Extreme changes in climate, 27/03/2017. As per the fifth Assessment report (AR5) of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published in 2014, globally averaged combined land and ocean surface temperature has risen by 0.85 0C [0.65 to 1.06] over the period 1880 to 2012.

This report shares a series of solutions, policy responses and case studies from UNICEF’s work around the world. In times of drought or flood, in areas where the sea level has risen or ice and snow have unseasonably melted, children are at risk, as the quality and quantity of water available to them is under threat.

Across the world 663 million people still do not have access to water; the vast majority of them - over half a billion - live in rural areas.

This annual statement confirms that 2016 was the warmest year on record, approximately 1.1 °C above the pre-industrial period, and 0.06 °C above the previous highest value set in 2015. Noteworthy extreme events in 2016 included severe droughts that brought food insecurity to millions in southern and eastern Africa and Central America.

The record-breaking heat that made 2016 the hottest year ever recorded has continued into 2017, pushing the world into “truly uncharted territory”, said WMO in its annual statement on the State of the Global Climate ahead of the World Meteorological Day

Central America is undergoing an important transition. Urban populations are increasing at accelerated speeds, bringing pressing challenges for development, as well as opportunities to boost sustained, inclusive and resilient growth.

This report lays out the multi-billion dollar threats and opportunities of climate adaptation, exploring avenues to increase investment into adaptation. The report provides recommendations to overcome barriers to action.

Future extreme sea levels (ESLs) and flood risk along European coasts will be strongly impacted by global warming. Yet, comprehensive projections of ESL that include mean sea level (MSL), tides, waves, and storm surges do not exist. Here, we show changes in all components of ESLs until 2100 in view of climate change. We find that by the end of this century, the 100-year ESL along Europe's coastlines is on average projected to increase by 57 cm for Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP)4.5 and 81 cm for RCP8.5.

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