Climate change is becoming an existential threat with warming in excess of 2°C within the next three decades and 4°C to 6°C within the next several decades. Warming of such magnitudes will expose as many as 75% of the world’s population to deadly heat stress in addition to disrupting the climate and weather worldwide.

This report documents interviews with stakeholders conducted in India, Kenya and Ethiopia to begin to understand how they do, and could, use the science of extreme event attribution (EEA), so that any future analyses in the region can take account of user needs.

This is the worst flooding in Mumbai since 2005

From Houston all the way to Mumbai and from Nepal to the desert state of Rajasthan, rains have cut a swathe of destruction with flooded streets and thousands marooned as their cities and villages g

A "wave of legal action" over climate change has already begun and cases will become more likely to succeed as the scientists get better at attributing extreme weather events to global warming, act

A new study carried out by engineers from the University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney and published this month (August) in Nature Scientific Reports, analysed real-world effects of river flows

Humans are causing Earth’s climate to change. We know that. We’ve known it for decades. Okay so what? The follow-up questions should be directed to what the effects of warming will be.

SHIMLA: Stating that India is facing a challenge of sustaining its rapid economic growth while dealing with threat of climate change globally, chief minister Vibhadra Singh said that a comprehensiv

This country profile provides a comprehensive overview of climate change science and policy in Pakistan, drawing insights from national and international literature. Catastrophic floods, droughts, and cyclones have plagued Pakistan in recent years. The 2010 flood killed 1,600 people and caused around $10 billion in damage.

Typically 20–40 extreme cyclone events (sometimes called 'weather bombs') occur in the Arctic North Atlantic per winter season, with an increasing trend of 6 events/decade over 1979–2015, according to 6 hourly station data from Ny-Ålesund. This increased frequency of extreme cyclones is consistent with observed significant winter warming, indicating that the meridional heat and moisture transport they bring is a factor in rising temperatures in the region.