Most developed countries now implicitly or explicitly aim to promote more compact urban forms, as compactness is associated with a wide range of positive effects: increases in productivity due to agglomeration economies, travel time savings, and a smaller ecological footprint due to lower energy and land consumption.

This paper offers a brief review of the green financial reforms that are likely to be most relevant to supporting infrastructure investing. The authors have consolidated data on various aspects of green investment in China to present a first snapshot of the combined progress in mobilizing green finance.

This paper describes the relatively new phenomenon of publicly-capitalized green investment banks and examines why they are being created and how they are mobilizing private investment.

In urban infrastructure the investment decisions taken today will shape tomorrow. Despite the critical importance of infrastructure for urban development, financing to scale up smarter, more sustainable urban infrastructure remains an immense challenge, particularly in emerging and developing economies.

If India continues with its current trend of ‘poorly planned, sprawling and unconnected’ pattern of urbanisation, it could cost the country upto USD 1.8 trillion by mid-century finds this study by New Climate Economy

Africa’s “Growth Miracle” in the 21st century has reversed a long standing narrative of pessimism about the region. It has emboldened hope for the future. GDP growth reached around 5% annually from 2001-2014. Rates of extreme poverty fell substantially. Yet big challenges remain. Growth slumped in 2015 and 2016.

Given their convening power, technical expertise and their ability to mitigate risks, multilateral and national development banks are particularly well placed to coordinate these activities, globally, and at the regional and country levels.

This paper provides an overview of the available evidence on the link between the effectiveness of transport systems and economic, social and environmental performance.

A new report from the New Climate Economy finds that land use practices that restore degraded agricultural or forest lands and protect natural areas could reduce emissions by as much as 9.0 Gt CO2e by 2030 while also delivering more productive agricultural lands and greater resilience of rural livelihoods.

Worldwide, a significant proportion of the private sector receives some level of support, interventions and subsidies from the public sector. In the specific case of energy subsidies

Pages