Old-growth forests remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere

Global warming is inevitable. Therefore, the need is to develop strategies to reduce the greenhouse gases from the atmosphere. Carbon sequestration through biomass seems to be a cheap and viable option. There are several land-use options which can sequester carbon. Their potential of locking carbon differs not only with the type of species, but also with the agroclimatic zones. Hence, location-specific land-use systems need to be

A study was conducted to estimate the soil organic carbon pool under Eucalyptus, Poplar, Shisham and Teak plantations in Haridwar and Dehra Dun, districts of Uttarakhand and Yamunanagar District of Haryana State.

Green Jobs: Towards Decent Work in a Sustainable, Low-Carbon World is the first comprehensive report on the emergence of a

of greenhouse gases, is of major concern in terms of the global warming phenomenon. To mitigate the effect of atmospheric CO2, carbon capture and storage (CCS) has been found to be an important tool. The present study aims at explaining the role of soils as one of the most important natural resources in enhancing

In tackling climate change, policy makers often overlook the role
of the natural world in regulating greenhouse gases in the
atmosphere: specifically, the unique role that forests and
peatlands have to play in the battle against rising emissions.
Changing approach would significantly reduce the cost of
tackling climate change and deliver a variety of other benefits.

In tackling climate change, policy makers often overlook the role of the natural world in regulating greenhouse gases in the atmosphere: specifically, the unique role that forests and peatlands have to play in the battle against rising emissions. Changing approach would significantly reduce the cost of tackling climate change and deliver a variety of other benefits. This report argues that preventing deforestation, promoting
afforestation/reforestation and stopping peatland destruction
are some of the cheapest and most effective ways of reducing
global emissions.

Climate change poses a threat to all ecosystems. In the case of the wetland ecosystem, not only will the water bodies and their economic benefits be lost; they could directly contribute to climate change by releasing a large amount of trapped greenhouse gases. That assessment from scientists taking part in the Eighth Wetlands Conference held in Brazil by INTECOL, the International Association for Ecology, will hopefully stir governments into action. It is vital that they r ecognise the gravity of the problem and act to stop the degradation, draining, and land-filling of wetlands.

Oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) were episodes of widespread marine anoxia during which large amounts of organic carbon were buried on the ocean floor under oxygen-deficient bottom waters. OAE2, occurring at the Cenomanian/Turonian boundary (about 93.5 Myr ago), is the most widespread and best defined OAE of the mid-Cretaceous.

It all seemed too easy by half: to beat global warming just sprinkle some iron in the ocean, then watch as algae bloom en masse, sucking up carbon dioxide by the tonne. Now the idea is looking increasingly unlikely to go ahead in a big way. In the wake of a UN moratorium on the practice, the latest research suggests that seeding will trigger the build-up of an acid that can be lethal to marine organisms and humans.

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