Oxfam India is part of a global movement working to fight poverty, injustice and inequality. In India, it works in six states.

Despite decades of concerted global conservation efforts, biodiversity loss continues unabated, making it important to assess the effectiveness of conservation approaches. Using forest cover as a proxy for conservation effectiveness, we analysed land-use and land-cover changes across a community and a state forest of Jaintia Hills, Meghalaya, India. Forest losses in the community lands (77.94 sq. km) were higher compared to the state forest (11.48 sq. km) between 1994 and 2014, and were driven by mining, industry, plantations and agriculture.

Friends of the Earth groups are building a more just and sustainable Asia. The report "Transforming Asia; Scaling up the solutions" highlights some of the innovative and transformational solutions underway; from community forest management in Indonesia to building solar cooperatives in South Korea, and winning the legal right to food in Nepal.

The benefits of community-based forestry are well known.

The Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) has released the draft of India’s new National Forest Policy (NFP), proposing the levy of a green tax.

Forest dwellers inside Odisha’s Similipal Tiger Reserve (STR) have put forward their own Community Forest Resource Management and Conservation (CFRMC) plan for vast forest stretches.

Community-based forestry has shown itself to be a potent vehicle for promoting sustainable forest management, reducing poverty and generating jobs and income for rural communities, but unlocking its true potential will require greater support by governments through policy reforms and other measures.

Forest Rights Act 2006 recognizes and vests forest rights to the scheduled tribes and other traditional forest dwellers who have been residing in forests in generations but whose rights could not be recorded.

This study entails extensive literature review of linkages between adaptation and mitigation at the global policy level, through analysis of relevant policies and protocols in the context of climate change in general and forest landscape restoration (FLR) in particular.

Historically, usage and access of forest resources by India’s Adivasi community and other forest dwellers have been considered as encroachment and their efforts of forest land acquisition have been used as evidence of their anti-development attitude.

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