Enable Block: 

Climate change threatens to undermine Thailand's efforts to combat illegal fishing and avoid a potential European Union ban on exports by the multi-billion dollar seafood industry, environmental gr

Marrakesh — Climate change threatens the fishing and seafood business all around the world, and efforts are underway to adapt

We’ve all been worrying over the state of the Great Barrier Reef, but new research has shown that it’s not the only important part of our oceans that’s struggling with the effects of climate change

Remote polar and deepwater fish faunas are under pressure from ongoing climate change and increasing fishing effort. However, these fish communities are difficult to monitor for logistic and financial reasons. Currently, monitoring of marine fishes largely relies on invasive techniques such as bottom trawling, and on official reporting of global catches, which can be unreliable. Thus, there is need for alternative and non-invasive techniques for qualitative and quantitative oceanic fish surveys.

The global fisheries sector could suffer an annual revenue loss of $10 billion by 2050 due to changes in climatic conditions, says a study by the University of British Columbia.

Climate change is disrupting the sensory systems of fish and can even make them swim towards predators, instead of away from them, say researchers.

Muscat: Global warming is less of a concern to the fisheries industries along the Omani coast during the summer season of June through September than previously thought, a new study has revealed.

United Nations — Farmers are already experiencing the effects of climate change but can also help to fight it, according to a new report released by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

This study identifies the capabilities needed by small-scale fishers to participate in Fishery Improvement Projects (FIPs) for yellowfin tuna in the Philippines. The current literature provides little empirical evidence on how different models, or types of FIPs, influence the participation of fishers in their programs and the degree which FIPs are able to foster improvements in fishing practices. To address this literature gap, two different FIPs are empirically analysed, each with different approaches for fostering improvement.

This research was carried out with the Adi and Galo tribes of East Siang and West Siang districts of Arunachal Pradesh, India to understand fishing methods employed by them using stones and boulders occurring in the river beds of small tributaries of the Siang River in the study area. The identified sustainable fishing technique is locally known as Lipum and practised by these communities. The capture of fish ranged from 4-10 kg per Lipum and one person could make 3-4 different Lipum structures per day.

Pages