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... a result of urbanisation?

Changes in climatic trends may be part of a decade long pattern known as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation

Changing climate conditions in the Northeast are wiping out the fragile orchids. Will other species follow?

Australian scientists say ocean warming has increased rainfall over the Southern Ocean

In the present study, the temporal patterns of monsoon floods on five large rivers of the Deccan Peninsula have been investigated. Analyses of the long-term annual maximum discharge/state data, available for the last 100 years or so, show non-random behaviour in terms of distinct periods of high and low floods.

Existence of Lake Nainital has been a matter of debate in the last two decades, because it is the only source of drinking water to Nainital city, a famous tourist resort in northern India. In the tectonically active lake basin, naturally occurring landslides have genered sediments in huge amount.

Engineers in Jaipur are developing a software that would help quench the thirst of parched villages

A 4.80 m long shallow water sediment core, collected from the inner shelf (at 22 m water depth) off Karwar, near Kali river mouth is studied for foraminiferal tracers of palaeomonsoons. The climate history of this core which represents the last 4,500 years approximately revealed the evidences of a significant change in the intensity of the precipitation around 2,000 years BP.

Statistics relating to the date of onset of the southwest monsoon over Kerala for the 100-year period 1891-1990 reveal that the mean and median dates of onset for south Kerala are 31 May and 1 June, with a standard deviation of 8.5 days. Declaring the date of monsoon onset is not a straightforward matter. However, rainfall pattern, uppper air circulation features and INSAT cloud pictures are useful guides, and these indicate that the onset date in 1990 esd 17-18 May. During 1891-1990 there have been onlyy 12 years in which the date of onset over Kerala has been on or before 18 May.

A research paper by Gowariker have used multiple and power regression involving 15 independent variables for long range forecasting of monsoon rainfall in India. They have also argued that, when most of the independent variables are 'favourable' almost invariably the monsoon rainfall is normal. In this note we formalize this approach using a parsimonious logistic regression model. The probability of a normal rainfall can be assessed in most cases using only five of the 15 variables.

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