Promotion of competition in the electricity industry in India is one of the key objectives of the Electricity Act, 2003. Power purchase costs constitute the largest cost element for distribution licensees.

Today, in India, we face both an environment as well as a development crisis. On the one hand we are still struggling with the problems of inequality, poverty and improving the human development indicators. On the other hand, environmental pollution and ecological destruction is now a runaway problem.

Promotion of competition in the electricity industry in India is one of the key objectives of the Electricity Act, 2003. Power purchase costs constitute the largest cost element for distribution licensees.

In India, 400 million people live without adequate electricity access in India and yet the solar lighting market remains nascent with penetration well below five percent.

A new report commissioned by IHS Towers, the largest mobile telecommunications infrastructure provider in Africa, Europe and the Middle East, has disclosed that Africa must deliver a renewable power revolution as happened with telecommunications, to reach its ambitious targets.

The paper intends to inform legislators across India about the potentials and pathways for using low carbon means for local area development and encourages them to take action.

Various villages falling under 41 panchayats in the Baddi-Barotiwala-Nalagarh Development Authority (BBNDA) will soon be illuminated with solar lights as the Ministry of Non-Renewable Energy, Gover

Promotion of competition in the electricity industry in India is one of the key objectives of the Electricity Act, 2003. Power purchase costs constitute the largest cost element for distribution licensees.

The Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE), Government of India has announced an ambitious solar target of 100,000 megawatts (MW) installed capacity by 2022, of which 40,000 MW of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems are to be installed on rooftops.

Renewable Energy and Jobs – Annual Review presents the status of renewable energy employment, both by technology and in selected countries, over the past year. In this third edition, IRENA estimates that renewable energy employed 8.1 million people around the world in 2014 (excluding large hydropower).

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