On 8 April 2019, a Round Table was held in the The Hague, for the China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development and its Task Force on Green Urbanization and Environmental Improvement. This is the report of the Round Table.

Building resilience to increasingly intense climate change impacts requires effective, urgent adaptation action at the local level. While much progress has been made within the international and national arenas, efforts to successfully implement adaptation at the subnational level remains uneven.

Long-term planning for climate and development requires tailored governance and institutional arrangements. Most countries have some experience with climate-change planning over near- and medium-term horizons through efforts such as nationally determined contributions (NDCs) and low-emissions development strategies (LEDS).

World Report 2019 is Human Rights Watch’s 29th annual review of human rights practices around the globe. It summarizes key human rights issues in more than 90 countries and territories worldwide, drawing on events from late 2017 through November 2018.

Prudent economic policies, combined with the enabling conditions created by a high endowment of water, have transformed Vietnam from a low-income to a middle-income country within two decades. Though growth has produced vast benefits, it has also placed unrelenting pressures on water resources, which in turn lead to economic stresses.

The Climate Group released a report titled ‘Driving Climate Action: State Leadership in India’ which substantiates the role of Indian states in driving climate action and economic growth.

Development is vital for reducing disaster risk, yet many current development models are unsustainable and are instead driving and creating disaster risks.

How does the state govern cities where much of the economy is informal, on the margins of state regulatory institutions?

With the global demand for sand and gravel standing at 40 to 50 billion tonnes per year, a new report by UN Environment reveals that aggregate extraction in rivers has led to pollution, flooding, lowering of water aquifers and worsening drought occurrence.

The increasing demand for water, energy and food, and the interdependence of these systems could lead to potential human conflict in the future. This was seen in the food crisis of 2008, which stirred a renewed interest in taking a “systems” approach to managing resources.

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