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Achieving universal, safely managed water and sanitation services by 2030, as envisioned by the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6, is projected to require capital expenditures of USD 114 billion per year (1). Investment on that scale, along with accompanying policy reforms, can be motivated by a growing appreciation of the value of water. Yet our ability to value water, and incorporate these values into water governance, is inadequate.

The African Development Bank Group (AfDB) approved two loans amounting to $171 million (about Rwf144 billion) to finance Rwanda’s Sustainable Water Supply and Sanitation programme.

Ghana has been named among the top 10 countries worldwide with the highest percentage of 85.7 of its population without decent toilets.

Ongwediva — In the quest to increase sanitation coverage and accessibility to proper toilets in the country, five more villages are awaiting to be verified and certified as Open Defecation Free (OD

The United Nations Children Funds (UNICEF) says Nigeria is ranked third among the countries of the world where people still practise open defaecation.

Millions of Kenyans, without toilets in their homes, are forced to endure their neighbours' unsavoury smells and habits in a shared pit in the ground or nearby fields.

This report provides concise exposition of the Malaysian urban wastewater management under the country’s existing primary federal environmental legislation.

The discourses on rural and urban spaces in India in the context of physical infrastructure have divulged their inherent characteristic differences.

It is easy to take a toilet for granted – lock the door, do your business, flush when finished, and forget all about it. But for 2.3 billion people worldwide – almost one in three – such a normal part of daily life is out of reach.

Open defecation costs Ghana over 79 million dollars a year, a 2012 World Bank report says.

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