There is increasing interest in mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the dairy sector in developing countries. However, there is little prior experience with measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) of GHG emissions and emission reductions.

There is increasing interest in mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the dairy sector in developing countries. However, there is little prior experience with measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) of GHG emissions and emission reductions.

The UNFCCC’s Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture creates an opening for agroforestry to take on an important role in Africa’s response to climate change.

About half of developing countries express ambition to use agroforestry—the integration of trees with crops, livestock and other non-forest timber products—for adaptation and mitigation of climate change.

Several countries are developing nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs) in the livestock sector. Compared to research on emission factors, much less attention has been paid to understanding systems for collecting activity data on change in livestock management practices and animal performance.

This report gives an overview of current practices, challenges and opportunities in the measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) of livestock greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and emission reductions by developing countries in the context of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

This review has been undertaken in the context of preparation of a concept note for the Kenya dairy NAMA. Biogas promotion is one of the project components.

Given the projected increase in the demand for animal-source foods in developing countries, trends in livestock GHG emissions and other environmental impacts, there is an urgent need to change livestock production.

This review of national greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation planning in the agriculture sector provides national policy makers and others in the agriculture sector with an overview of national mitigation planning processes to aid them in identifying the relevance of these processes for promoting agricultural development.

Methane (CH4) uptake by steppe soils is affected by a range of specific factors and is a complex process. Increased stocking rate promotes steppe degradation, with unclear consequences for gas exchanges. To assess the effects of grazing management on CH4 uptake in desert steppes, we investigated soil-atmosphere CH4 exchange during the winter-spring transition period.

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