In a statement, eight UN organizations stress that international transport and integrated supply chains are critical in recovering from COVID-19 achieving the SDGs.

Since the Rio+20, several African countries have adopted green-growth strategies and are pursuing green growth in selected sectors. As of June 2015, several countries had or were in the process of developing green economy strategies or action plans at the national level.

The coronavirus disease pandemic, while above all a public health crisis, has presented the African continent with unprecedented economic challenges. In order to contain cross-border transmission of the virus, countries have introduced various restrictions to cross-border and transit freight transportation.

No corner of the globe is immune from the devastating consequences of climate change. Rising temperatures are fueling environmental degradation, natural disasters, weather extremes, food and water insecurity, economic disruption, conflict, and terrorism.

For several weeks now, Africa has been fighting against an invisible enemy: COVID-19.

A post coronavirus recovery in Africa should address the fundamental causes of vulnerabilities and go beyond fiscal and monetary adjustments whose sole aim is to ensure the survival and perpetuation of the current system of production, consumption and distribution which is responsible for the climate crisis, according to a new discussion paper p

COVID-19, a global pandemic declared by the World Health Organization (WHO), is crippling the global economy and upending people’s lives thereby threatening sustainable development across all its dimensions. Africa is also facing the dire consequences of the crisis necessitating timely response, recovery and rebuilding policies and strategies.

The key factor that will determine the attainment of Africa’s development objectives is how the continent responds to its increasing need for access to adequate, secure and reliable energy services to industrialize, trade, provide better health and education services, reduce poverty and increase inclusion, boost economic growth and cater for pop

Africa faces significant challenges in accessing high-quality pharmaceuticals, exacerbating a continued high burden of disease. The availability of essential drugs in the public sector across the continent has been reported to be less than 60 per cent. One factor contributing to this shortfall is Africa’s heavy reliance on imported medicines.

The Index evaluates regional integration on the basis of five dimensions – trade integration, productive integration, macroeconomic integration, infrastructural integration, and integration in terms of free movement of people – for 54 African countries and for the eight RECs recognised by the African Union.

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