The Economic Commission for Africa defines structural transformation as the fundamental changes in economic and social structures that advance inclusive and sustainable development This definition addresses three key questions: a) What is structural transformation?

This report provides an overview of the key macroeconomic and social developments in Eastern Africa in recent years. With the aim of setting the scene for more in-depth policy discussion, it has also reviewed the major structural changes in the regional economies over the past 10 to 15 years.

African Governance Report V examines efforts to improve the governance of Africa’s abundant natural resources, with particular emphasis on strengthening natural resource governance institutions and frameworks for the enhancement of domestic revenue mobilization and engendering economic diversification and structural transformation on the contine

On average, Africa has reached the Millennium Development Goals horizon with remarkable performances in five of the eight Goals, even though not all five were fully achieved.

Despite the recent slowdown of the global economy and the weakening of Africa’s economic performance with the attendant implications for inclusion and sustainability, the long term growth outlook for Africa remains promising.

Africa’s positive economic growth over the past two decades has shown resilience in the wake of the international crisis of 2008. However, this positive performance has not yet translated its economic gains into meaningful social development.

This fourth edition of the African Governance Report focuses on the importance of measuring corruption and of understanding its international dimensions. The report challenges the traditionally narrow notion of corruption as the “abuse of public office for private gain”.

Africa’s “Blue word” is made of vast lakes and rivers and an extensive ocean resource base. The Blue Economy can play a major role in Africa’s structural transformation, sustainable economic progress, and social development.

African countries are in the process of upgrading and promoting the development of higher-productivity sectors, including manufacturing and high-end services.

Africa experienced strong economic growth in the last decade, and its medium-term growth prospects remain positive, despite global economic headwinds. However, this growth has not yet translated into commensurate benefits in economic diversification, decent jobs and rapid social development.

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