This is a technical policy brief for the HLPF on Sustainable Development Goal 15 prepared by the Forest Peoples Programme and produced by the Indigenous Peoples Major Group for Sustainable Development.

FPP has produced a new report presenting the outcomes of preliminary research on the practice of traditional occupations in indigenous and local communities.

In 2012 the world lost more than 20 million hectares of forest, adding to the threats faced by hundreds of millions of tropical-forest-dependent people, including at least 350 million indigenous people, who inhabit, use, have customary rights to, and rely on forests for their identity and survival as distinct peoples.

By providing estimated figures for indigenous and forest peoples’ populations in countries and regions across the globe, this new Forest Peoples Programme report seeks to raise awareness of the existence of peoples who primarily depend on forests for their livelihoods, and to enhance their visibility as key actors and rights-holders in the management and use of forests and forest resources.

When parties and observers arrived in Copenhagen last December (2009), for two weeks of intense negotiations, it was already clear that no legally binding agreement was expected to be

This study is an analysis of the social impacts and community engagement process for an IFC-supported project in Chhattisgarh, India. It also provides an assessment of the application of IFC Performance Standard 7 (Indigenous Peoples) and related IFC standards and requirements

This present report further calls attention to the dangerous and urgent situation that persists and has intensified in the northeast states of India as a result of India

Like State governments in many other parts of India, the government of Jharkhand State is planning large-scale industrial expansion across the entire region in the name of development and poverty reduction. To the dismay and disillusionment of mass