A recent report has revealed that around 20 dairy companies are responsible for more greenhouse emissions than Germany, Britain, or France. The livestock companies are earning billions of dollars in this operation.

Sustainable transport and mobility are key to tackle the climate crisis and to achieve the targets of the European Green Deal. However, transport today accounts for nearly 30 percent of the CO₂ emissions within the European Union.

China’s emissions pathway during the coming decades is probably the single biggest factor in determining the achievability of the climate targets agreed in Paris. This fact is due to the still growing size of the Chinese economy and its carbon intensity, based on its reliance on coal to fuel the power system.

South Africa’s economy, which was already in a precarious state before Covid-2019, has been tipped into full blown crisis by the pandemic. Gross na-tional government debt is expected to be upwards of 86% within two years.

Low-income countries (LICs) are suffering from triple distresses: the mortal impact of Covid-19, increasing debt burdens, and climate change impacts. Obviously, they are all suffering from a liquidity crunch because of competing national priorities.

The Debt-for-Climate Initiative (DCI) is an effort to provide comprehensive debt relief for eligible countries to generate fiscal space for climate action. The DCI aims at achieving maximum creditor and debtor participation. The DCI consists of three pillars.

How should policymakers respond to the reality and future prospect of vast populations being displaced and relocated in an era of global heating? With climate change looming, anxiety over immigration from the Global South is increasingly fuelled by apocalyptic fears of ecological breakdown.

This paper discusses how debt-for-climate swaps can be useful “triple-win” instruments to address the climate crisis by ensuring the protection of valuable terrestrial and marine ecosystems, while also contributing to debt sustainability.

The amount of nuclear waste is growing worldwide. But even 70 years after the beginning of the nuclear age, no country in the world has found a real solution for the radiating legacy of nuclear power. The final disposal of nuclear waste poses major challenges to governments worldwide.

Every year, the EU promotes European agriculture with almost 60 billion euros per year. The agricultural atlas of the Heinrich Böll Foundation shows that hardly any of this money is used for healthy food, the protection of the environment, climate and biodiversity or the preservation of small and medium-sized businesses.

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