This report focuses specifically on the topic of renewable energy for heating and cooling for two reasons. First, the heating and cooling sector contributes largely to energy consumption, and therefore the emission of greenhouse gases. Globally, heating and cooling accounts for an estimated 40-50% of final energy demand.

While the climate debate is raging, the climate negotiations themselves are barely moving. Finger pointing seems to be the name of the game, with each negotiating bloc focused on passing the bill for solving the climate crisis onto the others. The process as a whole is in impasse, and it's time to admit it, as it's time to admit that disagreements about fairness and equity are at the centre of the impasse.

This study and the workshops that lead up to the International Conference for Renewable Energy 2004 in Bonn are primarily focused on learning experiences between Southern nations.

Anyone following the statements expressed from time to time about the renaissance of nuclear energy could get the impression that the number of new nuclear plants was increasing at an immense and steady rate. In fact, more recent statistics show 60 plants in the process of being built, the majority in China and others in Russia, India, South Korea and Japan.

A new myth of the nuclear lobby is the claim that nuclear power and renewable energies are complementary forms of energy. The authors Antony Froggat and Mycle Schneider prove the opposite: those who build nuclear power plants hinder the expansion of renewable energies.

The severe challenge posed by the need to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, especially in the
electricity generation sector, has led to renewed interest in the construction of nuclear power plants.
These would initially replace the aging stock of existing reactors, then meet electricity demand growth, and eventually replace some of the fossil-fired electricity-generating plants.

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