Jains are the wealthiest religious community in India. Delhi and Punjab are the richest states. Bihar is the poorest. These are the findings of the fourth round of National Family Health Survey (NFHS-4), recently released by the ministry of health and family welfare.

‘India suffers from twin-problem of under-nutrition and obesity’

NEW DELHI: Women's health in India is facing a serious nutritional challenge, with the country on the one hand grappling with the largest number of anaemic women in the world and on the other havin

Can large-scale social safety nets be nutrition sensitive even if they do not explicitly incorporate health and nutrition as programmatic goals?

The 2015-16 National Family Health Survey (NFHS-4), the fourth in the NFHS series, provides information on population, health, and nutrition for India and each state and union territory. For the first time, NFHS-4 provides district-level estimates for many important indicators.

Iron deficiency reduces capacity for physical activity, lowers IQ, and increases maternal and child mortality, impacting roughly a billion people worldwide. Recent studies have shown that certain highly consumed crops — C3 grains (e.g., wheat, rice, barley), legumes and maize — have lower iron concentrations of 4-10% when grown under increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations (550 ppm).

The report estimates the costs, impacts and financing scenarios to achieve the World Health Assembly global nutrition targets for stunting, anemia in women, exclusive breastfeeding and the scaling up of the treatment of severe wasting among young children.

This study found significant global decreases in all-cause child and adolescent mortality from 1990 to 2015, but with increasing global inequality. In countries with a low Socio-demographic Index (SDI), mortality is the primary driver of health loss in children and adolescents, largely owing to infectious, nutritional, maternal, and neonatal causes, while nonfatal health loss prevails in locations with a higher SDI.

Original Source

Over half of India’s women are anaemic and one in every five is underweight, reveals National Family Health Survey-4 (NFHS-4)

In a stark and chilling reminder of the realities of life in India, the recently released family health survey (NFHS 4) results show that over 58% of children below five years of age are anaemic, t

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