Most European companies have no target for reducing their greenhouse gas emissions even though 80% see climate change as a business risk, a survey has found. Among those that have set climate goals, only one in three stretch beyond 2025, according to the annual Carbon Disclosure Project report.

The 2019 edition of BP’s Energy Outlook, explores the key uncertainties that could impact the shape of global energy markets out to 2040.

The present report investigates the early, ongoing, and often surprising role of the fossil fuel industry in developing, patenting, and promoting key geoengineering technologies.

This working paper outlines three principles that can inform debate on an equitable phase-out of U.S. fossil fuel extraction. In order to avert the most extreme harms of climate change, the world must reduce net carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from all sources — especially fossil fuels — to zero by mid-century.

Increased oil and natural gas production in the United States has decreased domestic natural gas prices and global oil prices, with major economic and environmental consequences. The resulting greenhouse gas (GHG) impacts have received substantial attention, with most focus on natural gas and relatively little on oil.

This paper revisits the issue of environment and development raised in the 1992 World Development Report, with new analysis tools and data. The paper discusses inference and interpretation in a machine learning framework.

The paper uses two criteria to identify cities in the Global South that today are candidates for electrification – replacing fossil fuel–powered vehicles, stoves, furnaces and other devices with electric alternatives.

In January 2018, the city of São Paulo, Brazil, adopted Law 16.802, an amendment to its Climate Change Law that sets 10-year and 20-year targets for fleetwide reductions in tailpipe emissions of fossil carbon dioxide (CO2) and the air pollutants particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx).

Rail is among the most energy efficient modes of transport for freight and passengers, yet is often neglected in public debate, according to a new report by the International Energy Agency prepared in cooperation with the International Union of Railways (UIC).

This paper estimates the environmental impacts of reintroducing commercial supersonic transport (SST) aircraft into the global aviation fleet. Model the landing and takeoff (LTO) noise, sonic boom, and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from a new, unconstrained SST network of 2,000 in 2035.

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