Global warming, melting of glaciers, depletion of the ozone layer, rapidly vanishing ground water cache, drastic weather changes and ruthless felling of trees. When many of us are still clinical or insensitive to these issues, how on earth can we expect our corporate citizens to be concerned of environmental issues? Well, better late than never. Many Indian corporates, who only had mind for money so far, are increasingly waking up to these burning issues, and setting their priorities.

Forty years after he helped rescue the world from growing famine and a deepening gloom over the future of food supplies, Monkombu Sambasivan Swaminathan is once again agitating for revolution -- this time a perpetual one. The 82-year-old scientist, dubbed here the father of the Green Revolution for helping development a hybrid wheat seed that allowed Indian farmers to dramatically increase yields, says the current food crisis offers the world a chance to put farmers on the right road to unending growth.

NEW DELHI: Forty years after he helped rescue the world from growing famine and a deepening gloom over the future of food supplies, Monkombu Sambasivan Swaminathan is once again agitating for an agricultural revolution - this time a perpetual one. The 82-year-old scientist, regarded in India as the father of the Green Revolution for helping develop a hybrid wheat seed that allowed Indian farmers to dramatically increase yields, said the current food crisis offered the world a chance to put farmers on the right road to unending growth.

THE Chichewa people in Malawi have a saying: Njala ndi chilombo. It means "Hunger is a beast". Today, the beast is rampaging around the world and particularly Africa, where shortage of food threatens to undo recent economic and political gains. Climate change is partly to blame. But there is another less well recognised cause: long-term neglect has left African agriculture in a woefully inadequate state.

In a recent perspective, "Food security under climate change" (1 February, P. 580), M.E. Brown and C.C. Funk conclude that improved seed, fertilizer, land use and governance lead to food security. I find these claims highly questionable. The green revolution model (monocultures of improved crops supported through high levels of agrochemical and other inputs) has done much to increase agricultural productivity. It does little, if anything, to increase food security. (Letters)

This was not a sudden crisis. It may be only this spring that food prices have started sparking riots on the streets of Haiti and Egypt, not to mention rice rationing at Wal-Mart's cash-and-carry stores, but food prices have been rising since 2000. The rises accelerated in 2006, when global cereal stocks dropped to levels not seen since the early 1980s. And although the factors driving them are many and various, a good few of them look likely to persist for years to come. (Editorial)

Africa needs a green revolution. Food yields on the continent are roughly one metric ton of grain per hectare of cultivated land, a figure little changed from 50 years ago and roughly one third of the yields achieved on other continents. In low-income regions elsewhere in the world, the introduction of high-yield seeds, fertilizer and small-scale irrigation boosted food productivity beginning in the mid-1960s and opened the escape route from extreme poverty for huge populations. A similar takeoff in sub-Saharan Africa is both an urgent priority and a real possibility.

Demand for plant products has never been greater, more people, rising affluence, and expanding biofuels programs are rapidly pushing up the prices of grain and edible oil. Boosting supply isn't easy: All the best farm land is already in use. There's an acute need for another jump in global agricultural productivity-a second Green Revolution. Can it happen? Will it happen? (Editorial)

Today, as we mark the 38th World Earth Day, in the light of the recent breaking of an ice shelf in the Antarctic region, the warning signals are clear: time is running out. The high pollution levels, the depletion of the ozone layer, and excessive global warming are no longer just predictions but are fast becoming a reality. The changes can be seen around us. According to reports, the number of hurricanes have almost doubled in the last 30 years.

Amid a deepening world hunger crisis, leading food aid groups are calling for a

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