Hunger in the Near East and North Africa region (NENA) continues to rise as conflicts and protracted crises have spread and worsened since 2011, threatening the region’s efforts to achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including Zero Hunger.

Stakeholders in the food industry have advocated the enactment of adequate policies to ensure food fortification and reduce malnutrition in Nigeria.

In recent years, the number of people experiencing hunger – both chronic and acute – has been alarmingly and persistently high.

More than 750,000 South Sudanese children under age 5 are expected to face acute malnutrition this year, according to the International Rescue Committee.

A national newspaper said there were 11 million stunted kids in Nigeria, a problem that would hold back the country's growth.

Oxfam’s new report “Ten Years after the Global Food Crisis, Rural Women Still Bear the Brunt of Poverty and Hunger” analyses the reforms implemented since the food price crisis in 2007-2008, and highlights why they will not be enough to prevent another crisis or end hunger.

Around 113 million people in 53 countries experienced acute food insecurity in 2018, compared to 124 million in 2017 finds this new report by the European Union, the FAO and the UN World Food Pro

The UNICEF, WHO and the World Bank inter-agency team regularly updates joint global and regional estimates of child malnutrition.

The Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) is a common global scale for classifying the severity and magnitude of food insecurity and malnutrition.

For 18-year-old Rebecca Adara, a plate of boiled wholegrain sorghum is enough to keep her strong and attentive all day round at school.

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