The increasing demand for water, energy and food, and the interdependence of these systems could lead to potential human conflict in the future. This was seen in the food crisis of 2008, which stirred a renewed interest in taking a “systems” approach to managing resources.

This paper looks at two particular, yet interlinked, aspects: the current financial flows related to climate adaptation strategies, and the institutional landscapes in place for driving adaptation planning and action on the ground, with a particular focus on the water sector.

This report reviews the status of water resources and climate trends, and their expected impacts on water-related hazards and associated risks in South Asia, one of the world’s regions most vulnerable to climate change. The monsoon-driven climate combines intense rainfall generating devastating floods that alternate with extensive dry periods.

Agricultural water has been for decades viewed under conventional irrigation attention in terms of public investment to other agricultural water management practices, such as rain water harvesting, that are of much relevance for smallholder-based cases.

Water is the key medium that links atmospheric temperature rises to changes in human and physical systems. Climate change will alter the hydrological cycle in many ways. The trigger is the warming of the atmosphere and oceans, which will change major weather systems.