Climate finance is an indispensable enabler of enhanced climate action. Transparency regarding the scale and type of climate finance provided and mobilised by developed and other countries, and received by developing countries, is important for national and international purposes.

Adaptation responses are needed to address the existing levels of climate variability and to prepare for future climate impacts. There is wide agreement that adaptation is an important issue and would benefit from being enhanced through more effective action and better planning.

This paper explores the possible role of the 2015 agreement in promoting further mobilisation of climate finance for developing countries in the post-2020 period.

Sectoral approaches are proposed as a means to broaden the global scope of greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation to developing countries. Market mechanisms are put forward in that context to create incentives for mitigation in developing countries beyond the existing Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), and to

Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies are increasingly recognised for their capacity to provide a large contribution to the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions in the coming decades. This paper assesses the policy questions as highlighted in the relevant COP/MOP 2 decision, particularly leaks and permanence for geological storage, project boundaries and liability issues, and leakage, as well as a few others raised by some parties.