Demand for organic basmati rice (OBR), both at home and abroad, coupled with policy reforms in India have given rise to contract farming (CF) production in that nation. OBR production, however, is highly susceptible to weather and pest risks.

Examine temporal and spatial trends in public and private expenditure on agriculture in India, and its welfare effects in terms of agricultural growth and mitigation of rural poverty.

India, a country with high concentrations of poor and malnourished people, long promoted a cereal-centric diet composed of subsidized staple commodities such as rice and wheat to feed its population of more than a billion. Today, however, dietary patterns are changing.

Over the past two decades, many developing countries have achieved remarkable progress in improving dietary quality and reducing child-stunting rates. But understanding of the linkages between food expenditures, dietary quality, and nutritional outcomes is limited.

A goal of agricultural policy in India has been to reduce farmers’ dependence on informal credit. To that end, recent initiatives have been focused explicitly on rural areas and have had a positive impact on the flow of agricultural credit.

The Green Revolution bypassed Bihar in its first wave in the 1960s and 1970s. Subsequently, during a short interval in the late 1980s and early 1990s, the agricultural growth rate reached almost 3 percent per year, one of the highest in the country, though over a smaller base.

The world was caught in a severe economic crisis, which primarily originated from the U.S. in early 2007. Over the past two years, the crisis has virtually spread to the entire world causing an extreme credit crunch. The agricultural sector has also felt the heat of the meltdown, but there is a lot of uncertainty about the magnitude of the impact of economic recession on agriculture.

In this paper, the authors examined the influence of urbanisation on agricultural activities in Andhra Pradesh. The findings indicate a larger concentration of high value food commodities in the urban and peri-urban areas than in hinterlands/rural areas.

Intensive agriculture and excessive use of external inputs lead to degradation of soil, water and genetic resources. Widespread soil erosion, nutrient mining, depleting water table and eroding biodiversity are the global concern which are threatening the food security and livelihood opportunities of the farmers, especially the poor and underprivileged.

Meghalaya is a landlocked state where the progress of industrialization is very slow. Majority of the population (rural) depends on agriculture. Agriculture in the state is carried on in primitive ways with Jhumming prevailing in many parts. This practice is considered destructive as vast forest areas are cleared and burnt. Such areas are used for cultivation and left out.