The Early Warning Early Action (EWEA) report on food security and agriculture is developed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO).

Changes in global food systems and the increased globalization of the food supply means that populations worldwide are at risk of exposure to various food safety hazards. This can affect public health, food security, national economies and international trade says this new report released by the FAO

Since late 2019 early 2020, an outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) – an infectious disease caused by a newly discovered coronavirus – has rapidly spread across the world, devastating lives and livelihoods.

The census of agriculture seeks to collect data on seasonal agricultural activities. Accordingly, countries schedule census enumeration periods to ensure that the required data is collected at the right time.

Implementing adequate social protection measures in response to COVID-19 is critical to saving both lives and livelihoods. Ensuring that these measures reach rural populations will be key to avoid further spread of poverty and hunger. The fight against COVID-19 will be particularly challenging in rural areas.

Food Supply chain is a complex web of interactions and of actors: producers, inputs, transportation, processing plants, shipping, etc. § As the virus spreads and cases mount, and block downs increase there are seemingly countless ways the food system will be tested and strained in the coming weeks and months.

The FAO Global Forum on Food Security and Nutrition (FSN Forum) is an inclusive, neutral platform for people and institutions to share knowledge and support policy-making.

This case study documents insights on gender mainstreaming practices implemented in a large-scale agriculture development project with a climate change adaptation component in Western Province, Zambia.

Some 6.5 million people in South Sudan - more than half of the population - could be in acute food insecurity at the height of this hunger season (May-July), three United Nations agencies warned.

The worst desert locust outbreak in decades is underway in the Greater Horn of Africa, where tens of thousands of hectares of cropland and pasture have been damaged in Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia with potentially severe consequences for agriculture-based livelihoods in contexts where food security is already fragile.

Pages