This report by Institute for European Environmental Policy presents insights on critical water-related ecosstem services and on wider ecosystem services from wetlands. It calls for commitment and investment in the conservation and wise use of wetlands.

This publication intends to foster a better understanding and utilization of green economy indicators. “Measuring Progress Towards a Green Economy” is a practical guidebook that looks at how indicators can be used in a way that specifically supports and tracks green economy policies.

The LSE Cities/ICLEI survey on Cities and the Green Economy provides an up-to-date overview on the experiences of cities around the world in the transition to the green economy.

This report aims to clarify and help mainstream nature’s role in the transition to a green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication.

To investigate the ‘promiscuous history’ of the efficiency of emissions trading markets, I draw from Actor Network Theory and specifically the work of Bruno Latour, highlighting how the commonly made claim to efficiency was constructed as a ‘fact’. I trace the processes, beginning in the early 1970s, that constructed first the inefficiency of command-and-control regulation through the distinction between the means and the ends of regulation, and the conversion of the specific 1970 Clean Air Act regulations into the archetypal form of command-and-control.

Environment Matters, the annual review on the environment by the World Bank Group, usually highlights the environmental research, accomplishments, and challenges of the Bank’s regions in the past year.

This report proposes a set of governance criteria to assess the greening of urban processes that go beyond the decision-making procedures, and includes the capacity to implement change, the results in greening the economy, and final outcomes on the ground.

This report is a sequel to the Greenpeace Book on Greenwash that was published a few days before the 1992 Earth Summit. That report documented the special relationship and undue influence that big business had on the Rio process.

Inclusive Green Growth: The Pathway to Sustainable Development makes the case that greening growth is necessary, efficient, and affordable. Yet spurring growth without ensuring equity will thwart efforts to reduce poverty and improve access to health, education, and infrastructure services.

Healthy ecosystems provide us with fertile soil, clean water, timber, and food. They reduce the spread of diseases. They protect against flooding. Worldwide, they regulate atmospheric concentrations of oxygen and carbon dioxide. They moderate climate. Without these and other “ecosystem services,” we’d all perish.

Pages