This new report published in the journal “ Lancet” says that the future of children around the world including India, is being threatened by ecological degradation and climate change and exploitative marketing practices that push heavily processed fast food, sugary drinks, alcohol and tobacco at children.

Road crash deaths and injuries in Nepal have been on a sharp upward trajectory since the early 2000s. In fiscal year 2017–18, 2,541 road deaths were officially reported in Nepal, which is equivalent to a fatality rate of 8.59 per 100,000 population.

Some 6.5 million people in South Sudan - more than half of the population - could be in acute food insecurity at the height of this hunger season (May-July), three United Nations agencies warned.

Although more children than ever are enrolled in school, far too many are not learning. A key factor that affects quality of education is the availability of public funding. Underinvestment in education can result in several conditions that negatively impact how and what children learn.

The surge in armed violence across Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger is having a devastating impact on children’s survival, education, protection and development. The Sahel, a region of immense potential, has long been one of the most vulnerable regions in Africa, home to some countries with the lowest development indicators globally.

In conflict and disaster, children suffer first and suffer most. Today, one in four of the world’s children lives in a conflict or disaster zone — a fact that should shake each of us to our core. All of these children face an uncertain future. Around the world, more than 30 million children have been displaced by conflict.

The UT Health Department is going to introduce rotavirus vaccine (RVV) in Routine Immunisation Schedule from July onwards.

If current trends are not checked, there will be more than 70 million babies born to teenage girls globally between now and 2030, a new report by Save the Children has found.

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) has said not less than 47 million Nigerians still indulge in open defecation in the country.

Based on WHO, Unicef guidelines, the draft policy with a roadmap for 2030, has been submitted to Yogi cabinet for approval

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