Although China has one of the most densely populated coastal areas on Earth and is home to some of the world’s busiest ports, it is not protected by an International Maritime Organization-designated Emission Control Area (ECA).

In December 2019, the China Ministry of Transport released an upgraded action plan for establishing a national domestic emission control area (DECA). This action plan marks China’s ambition to keep pace with world-class environmental regulations.

This paper estimates NOx emissions from merchant vessels in China’s coastal region from 2015 to 2030. The results indicate that merchant vessels have become a non-negligible source of NOx emissions, and if left unchecked, will become a prominent problem in the near future.

As China tackles its air quality issues, government regulators have turned their focus to shipping, an industry that burns thousands of tons of highly polluting heavy fuel oil near densely populated coastlines every day.

Ships are an efficient way to move cargo, transporting approximately 80% of the world’s goods by volume, but ships also threaten human health, ecosystems, and the climate. This report focuses on the air and climate pollutant black carbon (BC).

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is the key to avoiding the most catastrophic impacts of climate change. Despite international shipping being excluded from the Paris Agreement, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) is developing its own strategy to reduce GHGs from ships.

Compiles a high-resolution ship emissions inventory in the Greater Pearl River Delta (GPRD), a heavily populated and prosperous region with heavy ship traffic. Because this traffic contributes to poor local air quality, the Chinese government has identified the GPRD region as a key target for steps to control emissions from ships.