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The frequency of natural disasters, especially storms and floods, has been increasing globally over the last several decades. Developing countries are especially vulnerable to such disasters but are often the least capable of coping with the associated impacts because of their limited adaptive capacity.

This report presents the case for a "subsidy swap"—reallocating some of the savings from fossil fuel subsidy reform to fund the clean energy transition. Fossil fuel to clean energy subsidy swaps are already taking place.

This paper considers the potential extent of adaptation to sea level rise by examining the adaptation of communities in low-lying Philippine islands that flood during spring tides. Sea level rise poses a serious threat to small island developing states.

This status report provides an overview of the extent to which companies in their 2018 reports included information aligned with the core TCFD recommendations published in June 2017.

Climate Scorecard’s Global Spotlight Report looks at the ways in which leading  greenhouse gas emitting countries collect climate change data. A strong climate change data collection and information system should contain data that  is timely, reliable, consistent, comprehensive, and transparent.

A report by experts from 27 national science academies has set out the widespread damage global heating is already causing to people’s health and the increasingly serious impacts expected in future.

Changes in precipitation totals and extremes are among the most relevant consequences of climate change, but in particular regional changes remain uncertain. While aggregating over larger regions reduces the noise in time series and typically shows increases in the intensity of precipitation extremes, it has been argued that this may not be the case in water-limited regions.

Chinese financial institutions have little awareness about the risks of deforestation in the soy supply chain, according to a report released from the nonprofit disclosure platform CDP.

Crop yields are projected to decrease under future climate conditions, and recent research suggests that yields have already been impacted. However, current impacts on a diversity of crops subnationally and implications for food security remains unclear. Here, we constructed linear regression relationships using weather and reported crop data to assess the potential impact of observed climate change on the yields of the top ten global crops–barley, cassava, maize, oil palm, rapeseed, rice, sorghum, soybean, sugarcane and wheat at ~20,000 political units.

A New World Bank report examines how marine pollution in the Caribbean threatens the region’s resilience to climate change.

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