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Carbon pricing is the most cost-effective policy to address the climate challenge. Following the Paris Agreement, a first acceleration in the implementation of carbon pricing schemes has been observed and can expect a further acceleration over the next few years, as countries ratchet up their climate goals under their Paris commitments.

This study assesses how human-induced climate change has altered the likelihood and intensity of the July event or similar events. It uses a large number of climate simulations that were available at the time of study (8 ensembles of 10 to over 100 simulations each).

This discussion paper frames climate adaptation as a development challenge, reviewing what is known about its costs and benefits and the obstacles that private and public decision-makers face to adapt to climate change.

This discussion paper focuses on how, while many countries have made commitments or plans to integrate adaptation into their social and economic plans and policies, an “action gap” exists. A change in commitments and plans has not yet led to a significant difference in the way development is practiced in response to climate change impacts.

Insurance can be a key tool in reducing vulnerability and promoting resilience. Countries with high insurance coverage recover faster from disasters, and increasingly, governments are recognizing the role and benefits of insurance in transferring risk from disasters. Yet there is a large and even widening ‘protection gap’ of underinsurance.

The private sector is an essential partner in reducing the impacts of climate change and extreme-weather events on vulnerable people. This paper argues for the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement (“the Movement”) to reimagine its engagement with the private sector in addressing the humanitarian consequences of climate change.

This paper is designed to provide comprehensive details on the carbon markets across the major Asian economies and with specific attention to the Chinese carbon market. Particularly discuss the carbon markets across the major northeast (the People’s Republic of China [PRC], Japan, and the Republic of Korea) Asian economies.

Springs are the most important source of water for millions of people in the mid-hills of the Himalaya. Both rural and urban communities depend on springs for meeting their drinking, domestic, and agricultural water needs.

A universally accepted definition of green finance is not available yet, although several initiatives are ongoing across countries as also led by many international organizations.

Climate finance takes its roots in the ever-intensifying debate about the health of our planet and actions being undertaken (or planned) by countries, cities and companies to keep it habitable for future generations. Financing for climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts is a global, complex, political and economic issue.

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