Background As the 2019 Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) continues to spread, WFP Country Offices (COs) must be aware of the potential implications of the outbreak for WFP operations.

Around two-thirds of global GHG emissions are directly and indirectly linked to household consumption, with a global average of about 6 tCO2eq/cap. Changes in consumption patterns to low-carbon alternatives therefore present a great and urgently required potential for emission reductions. In this paper, we synthesize emission mitigation potentials across the consumption domains of food, housing, transport and other consumption.

Food Supply chain is a complex web of interactions and of actors: producers, inputs, transportation, processing plants, shipping, etc. § As the virus spreads and cases mount, and block downs increase there are seemingly countless ways the food system will be tested and strained in the coming weeks and months.

Namibia experienced significant rainfall deficits during the 2019 agricultural season, leading to below-average harvests in cereal-producing areas, particularlynorthern Namibia’s Omusati, Oshana, and Oshikoto regions, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) reports.

It is claimed that the world food supplies are more stable than the domestic supplies, and therefore free trade should achieve a higher degree of stability in prices and consumption than autarkic policies. The risk sharing implicit in such an argument, has, however never been formally examined.

This paper introduces the Agro-Chain Greenhouse Gas Emissions (ACGE) calculator, a calculator for estimating GHG emissions for food supply chains that addresses emissions due to agricultural production and post-harvest activities.

Food loss & waste (FLW) and associated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are important issues faced by human society related to both food security and climate changes.

Malnutrition is a global challenge that all countries need to address. Despite some progress, the world is not on track to meet globally agreed goals and targets for nutrition. While more than 149 million children have stunted growth, childhood overweight and obesity are increasing almost everywhere, and suboptimal diets are responsible for one in five (22%) adult deaths globally. (Comment)

Original Source

Actions to address different forms of malnutrition are typically managed by separate communities, policies, programmes, governance structures, and funding streams. By contrast, double-duty actions, which aim to simultaneously tackle both undernutrition and problems of overweight, obesity, and diet-related non-communicable diseases (DR-NCDs) have been proposed as a way to effectively address malnutrition in all its forms in a more holisitic way. This Series paper identifies ten double-duty actions that have strong potential to reduce the risk of both undernutrition, obesity, and DR-NCDs.

Malnutrition has historically been researched and addressed within two distinct silos, focusing either on undernutrition, food insecurity, and micronutrient deficiencies, or on overweight, obesity, and dietary excess. However, through rapid global nutrition transition, an increasing proportion of individuals are exposed to different forms of malnutrition during the life course and have the double burden of malnutrition (DBM) directly.

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