DUBLIN, Ireland – The Irish government is to contribute millions of euro to the replenishment of the Global Environment Facility Trust Fund (GEF).

A message to the Irish government to divest from fossil fuels is spelled out in lights in front of the lower house of parliament.

THE tiger padded south. Slipping through the grey-green teak forest he wound around thickets of wild sage, cloaked behind its orange flowers.

COLM STENSON drives around County Leitrim, pointing out new tree plantations. In this corner of Ireland, close to the border with Northern Ireland, conifers seem to be springing up all around.

This paper aims to extend and update the survey of extreme wave events in Ireland that was previously carried out by O'Brien et al. (2013). The original catalogue highlighted the frequency of such events dating back as far as the turn of the last ice age through to 2012. Ireland's marine territory extends far beyond its coastline and is one of the largest seabed territories in Europe. It is therefore not surprising that extreme waves have continued to occur regularly since 2012, particularly considering the severity of weather during the winters of 2013–14 and 2015–16.

Air pollution is forcing the UK government back to court for the seventh time.

Over the past few decades, substantial funding has been directed toward improving scientific understanding and management of impacts of climate change in the marine environment. Following concerns that the key messages from these studies were not reaching the public, a comprehensive opinion poll of 10,000 European citizens in 10 countries was conducted to establish levels of awareness, concern, and trust among different demographic groups (by age, gender, proximity to the coast) and nationalities. Citizens exhibited varying levels of self-declared “informedness” and concern.

Future extreme sea levels (ESLs) and flood risk along European coasts will be strongly impacted by global warming. Yet, comprehensive projections of ESL that include mean sea level (MSL), tides, waves, and storm surges do not exist. Here, we show changes in all components of ESLs until 2100 in view of climate change. We find that by the end of this century, the 100-year ESL along Europe's coastlines is on average projected to increase by 57 cm for Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP)4.5 and 81 cm for RCP8.5.

DUBLIN, Ireland - Even as hundreds of passengers suffered due to flights being delayed at the Dublin Airport as Storm Ewan swept across Ireland on Sunday.

Ireland has voted to be the world's first country to fully divest public money from fossil fuels.

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