Large landscapes encompassing reserves and areas with other human uses are necessary for conservation of many species. Generating information for conservation planning over such landscapes may be expensive and time-consuming, though resources for conservation are generally limited and conservation is often urgent.

The world can definitively stamp out a plague that devastates sheep and goats, freeing hundreds of millions of rural families from one of the major risks to their food security and livelihood.

Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious viral disease affecting sheep and goats, causes a staggering USD 1.45 billion to USD 2.1 billion in losses each year.

A research on gender in sheep and goat keeping was conducted in Namakkal district of Tamil Nadu to assess gender roles in participation and decision making. Data was collected from the sample size of 233 respondents using a well structured pretested interview schedule. The study revealed that most of the regular activities in sheep and goat keeping were performed by women while the occasional activities by men, although, women participated to a certain extent. Decisions on all the regular activities were taken independently by women.

The cumulative population of sheep and goat in Chhattisgarh stood at 33.91 lakh as per the 18th cattle census which is 17 per cent more than the previous year, Animal Husbandry Department officials

Odisha has witnessed a 5.59 per cent decline in the total cattle population, according to the 19th Livestock Census.

The Animal Husbandry and livestock sectors are critical for the rural economy, especially the small and marginal farmers. They not only contribute to their income but also their best insurance against any natural calamity. For planning purposes, the need for upto date and reliable data cannot be over emphasized.

There was slump in livestock farming in the country as compared to last year.

Punjab government will spend Rs1.4 billion to increase meat and milk production in the province.

A genetically modified cow whose milk lacks a substance that causes allergic reactions in people has been created by scientists in New Zealand.

In their first year of life, two or three in every hundred infants are allergic to a whey protein in milk called BLG. The researchers engineered the cow, called Daisy, to produce milk that doesn’t contain the protein. While the genetic alteration slashed levels of BLG protein in the cow’s milk to undetectable levels, it more than doubled the concentrations of other milk proteins called caseins.

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