Since 2008, the rush for land in developing countries has rapidly intensified but the sector remains largely unregulated and land deals are frequently agreed in secret between governments and investors.

This new study of large land acquisitions in developing countries by International Land Coalition says that while large land deals can create opportunities, they are more likely to cause problems for the poor, who often lose access to land essential to their livelihoods.

This paper by International Land Coalition looks into the impact of new agricultural investments on land tenure and food security especially for rural communities, women and indigenous peoples, as well as the environment.

This study provides an overview of the national-level controversy surrounding SEZs, before turning to a detailed account of the acquisition process and impacts of one SEZ in Polepally, Andhra Pradesh.

Kathmandu Valley has been subject to a rapid process of urbanization. Particularly noteworthy in recent years has been the spiraling price of land, with an associated boom in the real estate sector and land speculation.

Today, there is a growing consensus on the cross-cutting contribution of resource rights to reducing poverty, achieving food security, resolving resource conflicts and providing incentives
for sustainable resource management and as a contribution to democratic development.

This document is the result of an intensive work of dialogue between the ILC Secretariat and the ILC constituency, especially civil society organisations from Africa, Asia and Latin America. The ILC Secretariat - including the three regional nodes - has facilitated the process, collected contributions, packaged information, and produced the synthesis.